Friday, February 25, 2011

Greg Darley's "Passion Is Not Enough"

The idea of having passion for what you do or want to be has assumed the status of legend and myth, especially in but not limited to business. Insert “passion” and “business” in the search bar at Amazon.com and you’ll see more than a thousand results.

Passion is big business these days – and we’re not talking about romantic passion. The idea is take your passion – and turn into a business, a mission, a life. Do what you’re passionate about. Live your passion.

Greg Darley, director for Backstage Leadership.org has come along in Passion Is Not Enough: 4 Elements to Change the World to inject some much needed sanity into this discussion of passion, especially as it relates to ministry and mission. No matter what you set your mind to do – a new business, writing, art, music, ministry, mission – passion is not enough, he says. It’s important, but “success,” however defined, requires far more than passion.

In fact, he says, it requires four things: calling, character, doctrine and commitment.

Darley structures the book like a basic, simple road map. It’s not so much a step-by-step guide or instruction book as it is a detailed overview, utilizing stories and examples (from the life of the author as well as the lives of others).

The writing is engaging, straightforward and fast-paced, making the work both a thought-provoking and easy read. And it’s full of common sense and wisdom, wisdom based on life. Though Biblically based, the book is written to appeal to a broad audience.

So if you have something in mind that you know will change the world, remember that passion is not enough. And remember to read this book first.

8 comments:

Cassandra Frear said...

This is very interesting.

I kept recalling verses from the Bible as I read your review. I'm going to check this book out.

Michael said...

This is one of the best books I've read in a long time. Greg's enthusiasm is infectious.

Laura said...

ONe of the speakers at Jubilee last week said that he thought we were the "most gift-tested generation" ever. He emphasized that sometimes it takes time to find our gifts and calling and the most important calling we have is to share the gospel. We should always be doing that...being faithful in the moment.

Sounds like a good read, Glynn. Thanks for the review!

Miracle said...

Interesting book. I've never heard of it but it is definitely something that has sparked my curiosity.

I really agree with the four requirements.. especially doctrine and commitment. We all know people who are passionate about a choice because of selfish gain in money or pride. These temptations can sometimes guide us when we aren't even realizing it. This is why we always need to check our actions to make sure its based on Scripture.

I have heard many passionate people in my line of work. They are all excited about getting a certain project started that will revolutionize this or that. Most of the time they are right, but very few succeed. Few really have the commitment it takes to get past the difficult part of pushing through the obstacles. What a world we would have if people would really commit to their passions.

Maureen said...

Passion certainly will attract others; the four requirements listed are what will keep others returning and supporting a project and helping to make it successful.

nance marie said...

calling, character, doctrine and commitment...

and LOve

that has to do with God and our heart.

a mystery that can, because it is called Love, and we call so many things love, that it can be confused with passion.

calling, character, doctrine and commitment are
useless without LOve.

signed...bkm said...

Sounds like a book that will instill a vibrancy back to goal setting, stepping it up to a higher level of purpose...bkm

Peter Faur said...

To Darley's list - calling, character, doctrine and commitment - I'd also add competence. I haven't read the book, but I imagine he addresses this issue too. All the passion in the world won't make you effective unless you are competent at what you're trying to do.